Eduardo Kobra

Celebrated Muralist

Born in 1975 in south São Paulo, Kobra has become one of the most recognizable and celebrated muralists of our time. With works on five continents, he currently holds the record for the largest graffiti mural in the world. Influenced by both modern and contemporary artists, the realism of his designs often makes his flat-surface paintings appear three-dimensional.

Artworks by Eduardo Kobra

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Who is Eduardo Kobra ?

Born in 1975 in south São Paulo, Kobra has become one of the most recognizable and celebrated muralists of our time. With works on five continents, he currently holds the record for the largest graffiti mural in the world. Influenced by both modern and contemporary artists, the realism of his designs often makes his flat-surface paintings appear three-dimensional.

From São Paulo outskirts to the world: this is Eduardo Kobra. Born in 1975 in a poor neighborhood in São Paulo, Kobra began his career as a 12 years old teenager and, since then, has become one of the most recognized street artists of the world, with more than 5,000 murals over five continents.

With his project Greenpincel (2011), Kobra revealed his strong commitment to the environmental cause. Climate change, water pollution, deforestation, predatory fishing and mistreatment of animals are themes present in his pieces. In “Stars of Peace”, Kobra depicts individuals who have given hope to the world through their lives, such as Mother Teresa, Mahatma Gandhi, Malala Yousafzai and Anne Frank.

Kobra is involved in social causes, such as food collection campaigns and initiatives aimed at bringing art to poor communities, especially children with no access to it. In 2021, he started the Kobra Institute, which aims to bring art to vulnerable people in Brazil. During the pandemic, he leaded an initiative together with the private sector to raise funds to build oxygen plants for COVID-19 patients.